Is the new media model: copying, plagiarizing, rewriting and generally ripping off other people (like @nyscout)?

Nick Carr is a film location scout in NYC who has a great blog, Scouting NY. Recently he had the opportunity to write for the Wall St. Journal and turned in this fascinating store on The WWI British Biplane on a Rooftop in Lower Manhattan (Metropolis – WSJ). Gawker media must have thought it was fascinating, too, because they managed to rewrite the store here (Manhattan’s secret rooftop warplane)
and here (Why Is There a WWI Biplane On The Roof of This NYC Skyscraper?). The author of the Gizmodo story, @kellyhodgkins, tweeted: “Yes, it was your story and idea. And yes it was copy-edited by me for Giz. But I read your story and wrote my own version.”.

Check out the three stories and judge for yourself.

My belief is that this is going on all over the place, not just with these authors or Gawker media. In the same day I saw a similar thing happening on Huffington Post. It doesn’t excuse it, but I suspect authors from these sites are under pressure to turn in alot of material and end up resorting to this form of rewriting others work and most of the time no one even notices. This time, they did.

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2 responses to “Is the new media model: copying, plagiarizing, rewriting and generally ripping off other people (like @nyscout)?

  1. I’m glad you’re calling attention to this. I hope it’s not a trend, but I imagine it is. (The sincerest form of flattery, perhaps?) Props to David Carr for earning the scoop, and a resounding BOO to the copycats.

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