Daily Archives: October 9, 2014

4 p.m. recipe: Homemade Nutella Crêpes

I honestly don’t have to do more to get you to go to this link than share that photo, do I? I didn’t think so. Recipe from A CUP OF JO (Homemade Nutella Crêpes).

It’s Thursday: you can use some puns. Including some from a master.

Last night I shot an elephant in my pyjamas. No, actually, last night a friend of mine sent me this very punny version of “That’s amore” (see below) and it reminded me of the very funny (and punny) Groucho Marx. Here’s both: such a bargain!

When the moon hits your eye
like a big pizza pie
that’s amore.

When an eel bites your hand
with a pain you can’t stand
that’s a moray.

When our habits are strange
and our customs deranged
that’s our mores.

When your horse munches straw
and the bales total four
that’s some more hay.

When a beam from the sun
lights the heath where we run
that’s a moor ray.

When a sand-coated board
buffs your nails, yes milord,
that’s emory.

And our friend Mitch Albom
every Tuesday would come
to hear Morrie.

A New Zealander lad
sports tatoos by his dad.
That’s a Maori.

When a glacier’s retreat
piles up stones at its feet
that’s a moraine.

When two patterns of lines
cross to form new designs,
that’s a moiré.

The briefest of pauses
in poetic clauses,
they are morae.

What the palest young man
needs to get a good tan,
that’s some more rays.

When Othello’s poor wife,
she gets stabbed with a knife
that’s a Moor, eh?

A great whale in the sea
chases Raymond and me.
That’s Shamu, Ray.

When a Japanese knight
used a sword in a fight
that’s Samurai.

P.S. Here’s a link to the Groucho Marx video on YouTube.

Economic inequality is rising, plain and simple.

As this piece at Vox shows , economic inequality really is rising, no matter how you fuss with the data. Possibly because of the skepticism from some, Vox explores this using differing analysis. The conclusion is always the same: economically, things are getting worse.

Data aside, this anecdotal argument at the end of the piece nails it for me:

Outside the sphere of political debate, you also see the real world impact of inequality. Merrill Lynch recommends an investment strategy to its clients based on the growing economic clout of plutocrats, Singapore Airlines is now selling $18,400 first class cabin tickets, and observers think Apple is going to start selling a $10,000 watch. Conversely, Walmart is now primarily worried about competition from dollar stores. The executives at these companies are not hysterical liberals trying to drum up paranoia about inequality, they are trying to respond to real economic conditions — conditions that have entailed very poor wage growth paired with decent returns for those proserous enough to own lots of shares of stock.

Worthwhile and recommended.