Category Archives: education

My thoughts on the Ontario government changing the curriculum for math.

My first thought in going over some of the big changes to the Ontario high school math curriculum was: good! I am critical of the current government for many reasons, but this is a positive change by them.

I have been helping my son with his math since at least grade 9 to grade 12, and it has been frustrating for him and for me. The math he needs for university is academic and limited to specific areas like functions. This academic math  benefits students who will go to university to study physics or math and very few other subjects.  The non academic math is better, but you can’t get into even a business program with it. By changing the curriculum and stopping streaming, the government has done away with two problems with the way math is currently taught. The only downside to this is for math tutors. (Maybe.)

So “1/sine 30 degrees”**  cheers to government for this. 🙂

(Photo by Antoine Dautry on Unsplash )

** sine 30 degrees = 1/2. So 2 = 1 over that. lol.

End of university watch

classroom

It’s tempting to think that colleges and universities will start to see a major decline as a result of the pandemic. I think they will take a hit as a result of it, but I don’t think their demise is anywhere near. As this piece argues, people will take great lengths to take part in post-secondary educational experiences, pandemic or not: Why Did Colleges Reopen During the Pandemic? – The Atlantic

More than ever, the pandemic has made clear that major changes are required for post secondary education. Even before the pandemic, too many people waste their time and money going to university just so they can get a job. That’s wrong, but many employers demanded it. Fortunately, that is changing, as this piece shows:  14 companies that no longer require employees to have a college degree

Going to university is a good experience. Ideally I think university programs should split bachelor programs into 2. After two years, students could get some form of completion certificate. From there, they could go on to two more years of university study and complete their bachelor program, or they could switch to a vocational school and get something applied. (Or skip university all together.)

University isn’t for everyone. It should definitely not be something you need to start a job. A vocational school is fine for that. Indeed, most workplaces train people on the job once they hire them. Why wait for people to study something irrelevant to your profession?

P.S. Employers need radical rethinking of how they hire people. To see what I mean by radical, read this: This Company Hired Anyone Who Applied. Now It’s Starting a Movement.

(Photo by Changbok Ko on Unsplash)