Category Archives: new!

The beautiful signage of Robert Montgomery

I’ve loved the work of Robert Montgomery for some time. One of my favorite works of his is this:

You can see many more of his work at his site, here: ROBERT MONTGOMERY.

Worth a visit.

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Gorgeous: a pavilion made out of  wire mesh 

wire mesh pavillon

I would love to see this: An Expansive Pavilion of Architectural Elements Constructed from Wire Mesh by Edoardo Tresoldi (via Colossal). 

You really want to click on the link and see what it looks like from the many photos they have on the great art site, Collosal.

It really is a stunning space and a tremendous work. It’s as if a ghost of a building appeared and took over a space. Beautiful.

Some thoughts on the end of the CBC mail robots

mail robot
According to Haydn Waters, a writer at CBC, the mail robots at the corporation are being discontinued. Instead:

Mail will be delivered twice a week (Tuesday and Thursday) to central mail delivery/pickup locations on each floor.”

What gets lost in alot of discussions of robots, AI, etc., taking all the jobs is that the drivers for the decisions is not technology but economics. If there is no economical need for robots and other technology, then that technology will not just appear. There is nothing inevitable about technology, and any specific technology is temporary.

Of course there will be more use of robots and AI and other technology to replace the work people may currently do. The key to finding work will be to continually improvise and improve on the tasks one has to do to remain employed. That’s something humans do well, and technology will struggle with for some time in the future, AI hype not withstanding.

Multi-layered Laser-cut Wood Artworks by Martin Tomsky | Colossal

Art work
This is just one example of the stunningly intricate and beautiful multi-layered laser-cut wood artworks by Martin Tomsky featured over at Colossal. If you look carefully at the image you can see the layers of overlaid wood pieces.

I highly recommend you go to the site and see the rest of his work. Fantastic.

Where is Facebook now and why should you care

Facebook and politics

John Lanchester manages in a review of a number of books to extensively pin down where Facebook is, here:

John Lanchester reviews ‘The Attention Merchants’ by Tim Wu, ‘Chaos Monkeys’ by Antonio García Martínez and ‘Move Fast and Break Things’ by Jonathan Taplin · LRB 17 August 2017

Here’s some reasons why you should care, even if don’t use Facebook

Facebook has an ability to influence politics in ways that no one understands, except possibly Facebook. I don’t imagine they are going to share that information readily. Politicians need to push back on Facebook and discover the extent of their influence.

My belief is that the strength and influence of social media like Facebook is going to decline in the next few years. That’s not anywhere certain at this point, though, and the power they have needs to be limited now.

Here are 20 common misused English words. See if you misuse any of them.

Image from link to http://maristpoll.marist.edu/1221-whatever-most-annoying-word-or-phrase-except-among-young-americans/

When I first saw this: 20 misused English words that make smart people look silly in Quartz, I was confident that I would not be someone who misused any of them. Turns out there were a few that I did. Not many! But a few. 🙂

See if the same applies to you. If none, congrats!

 

A cautionary tale of what low taxes and libertarianism brings

Amish women on the beach
There can be many lessons that can be drawn from the story here: The Rise and Fall of the ‘Freest Little City in Texas’

The ones I drew were

  • You get the society you pay for. In this case, the people of this part of Texas were unwilling to pay for anything, and they got nothing in return. It’s hard to believe this even needs to be said in this age, but apparently it does.
  • Even basic services cost money. That money comes from taxes or service fees.
  • Those services are expensive to pay for individually: it makes much more sense for people to pool their money (in the form of taxes),  to make it cheaper overall for everyone.
  • Taxes are only part of what makes a society, but a society that is based on money and that does not have taxes is no society at all.
  • Only a society that does not depend on money can get away without taxes. Typically those a tightly knit,  cohesive, pre-money communities that depend heavily on sharing and barter. These communities are more socialist or communist in nature as opposed to libertarian. More like an Amish community or hippie commune or a religious community of some form.
  • The best way to have a libertarian society is to have one of great abundance. Scarcity requires people to share and work together if they want to survive.

It’s a good story. Read it for yourself and draw your own conclusions.

(Photo above is Amish women on the beach)